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Peter Pazzaglini

History
Columbia University

Peter Pazzaglini received his Ph.D. with distinction in medieval legal history from Columbia University. As a Senior Scholar at the Heyman Center for the Humanities, Adjunct Professor of History, and Special Lecturer in the Core, he has taught Contemporary Civilization for many years as well as Colloquia for the Friends of the Heyman Center. He has been consistently rated among the top University instructors.

For over a decade, he was a consultant in medieval legal history to the Library of Congress.  In addition, he worked as a Canon Law Fellow for the Vatican Library Project at the School of Law of the University of California, Berkeley, and as an instructor at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire.

His publications include a book on the use of the criminal ban in thirteenth-century Siena, Italy, a guide to consilia, or printed editions of medieval European legal briefs, in the United States, which has now become a standard reference work on the subject for law school libraries internationally, and a study of the comparable practices of medieval imprisonment. He also contributed to a multi-volume catalogue of Canon and Roman Law manuscripts in the Vatican Library. His current book projects include a new manuscript edition of the 1420 Treaty of Troyes, a discourse on the social contract, and a collection of open letters to his students on core topics such as suffering, friendship, wisdom, the fool, and self-knowledge.  He holds a U.S. Copyright on an innovative academic website used as a pilot in core programs.

Awards include Distinguished Service to the Core at Columbia, Phi Beta Kappa, Fulbright, National Endowment, and Woodrow Wilson Fellowships. He has reviewed for NEH, acted as a trustee of the Stonewall Community Foundation, and served as an academic interpreter at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. At present, he is on the Advisory Boards of Community Impact, the Heyman Center Colloquia Series, and the Center for Capitalism and Society at Columbia University.